In an effort to get media attention regarding his concern about a petroleum pipeline, a man and his grandson walked into a public meeting, without shirts, covered in what looked like oil (turns out it was chocolate cake frosting).

To no surprise, this got the attention of the local media and made for some attention-grabbing photographs.

Those in the regulated community understand the significant role that emotions can play with respect to environmental issues.  For agriculture, it’s multiple emotionally-charged issues including how food is grown, where it is grown, organic v. traditional sources of nutrients, raising livestock, and a host of other issues.

The management of nutrients and understanding the dynamics that are leading to excess nitrates in groundwater and algal blooms in lakes continues to be one of these important, and at times emotional, issues.

Nitrates in Groundwater: Identifying the Source Using Advanced Methods

As we have written on numerous occasions, the impacts associated with excess nutrients are complex.  Any suggestions that answers are obvious or solutions are easy are, at best, naïve.

the impacts associated with excess nutrients are complex. Any suggestions that answers are obvious or solutions are easy are, at best, naïve.

The impacts associated with excess nutrients are complex. Any suggestions that answers are obvious or solutions are easy are, at best, naïve.

While there are no guarantees, the better informed you are in regard to these “hot button issues,” the less likely you are to be caught off guard.

Our recent webinar, “Nitrates in Groundwater: Identifying the Source Using Advanced Methods,” was designed to help understand 1) the complexity of groundwater systems 2) the complexity of identifying the source of nitrates (e.g., chemical v. organic), and 3) some of the science behind sorting it out.

We hope the recorded webinar below is helpful in gaining a better understanding of nitrates in the environment.  If you have any questions about what is covered in the webinar, please feel free to contact Dr. Michael Sklash (msklash@dragun.com) or Jeffrey Bolin, M.S. (jbolin@dragun.com) at 248-932-0228.